If your Bullmastiff smells. Find a cause.

Sometimes dogs smell neutral but when they go outside they may return very stinky. You as an owner is very disappointed because you know that the cause is definitely not a lack of grooming.

It is hard to trace the smells of your canine back to their natural origins, but there are some general denominators that factor in a sudden smelliness.


First of all you should know that each dog has a natural smell. It is pretty strong. It even becomes stronger when a bath is not given every two weeks. This normal, bodily scent is spread to the body by scent glands that are located in various regions of the animals body: behind ears, underneath the chin, and of course in the anal region. Dogs that play in areas with sandy soils will most likely roll around in the soil. It is uncertain what the attraction is, but this is normal behavior and given half a chance, you will see your pet roll around in the dirt and look more content than ever! If you have cats that use the soil as a litter box then the dog quickly adopts that scent. In the same way, those dogs which take on the smell of their surroundings will rub against the ground in an effort to spread their natural scent around as well. Doing this, they may pick up some scent of other animals, including dogs, which have done the same thing. Bullmastiff have a naturally oily skin which makes it easy for dirt to get trapped against the skin. This makes an environment perfect for bacteria to multiply and before long the smell you notice is that of bacterial infections and also simply the trapped dirt mixed with oil and scent from the glands. A good bath will help you to solve this problem. Sometimes a stinky dog is a sign that it is time for a vet visit. When the smells come from the ears, there is the possibility that ear mites are present. These are itchy pests that cause a lot of troubles to your dog. Take your dog to the vet who will prescribe some medicine, and then clip the hair around the ears to help keep them dry and clean.  


Summary. Possible causes of smell:

  • Irregular bath and general grooming. Weekly bath may be enough for dogs that are kept indoors. Outdoor dogs need to be bathed every three days. Use a conditioning shampoo for dogs with dry-skin issues.
  • Skin infections. If your dog has symptoms of hair loss, rashes or scaly skin accompanied by an odor, see your vet. He may prescribe to treat your pet with a special type of antibacterial soap.
  • Check for ear infections. Symptoms are the following: dried blood in the ears, drainage, excessive scratching and a bad smell around the ear area. See your vet for an antibiotic ear-drop treatment. Regularly clean your pet's ears with a cotton ball dabbed in mineral oil.
  • Anal gland infection. A vet or dog groomer will do this. The anal glands are located near the anus and need to be expressed regularly in order to prevent buildup of bacteria and occasionally infection.
  • Regularly inspect your dog's teeth and gums for possible tooth decay and gum disease. Bloody gums, receding gum line, foul smell and teeth that obviously appear to be decayed should be treated by a vet.

It is necessary to find an area that causes smell and to prevent developing of infection if it is the reason of smell. If the cause is simple lack of grooming that means your dog need more frequent grooming than you think.